How to Troubleshoot And Repair an Electric Water Heater

 


heating repair

Here are 6 useful tips to help you with electric water heater repair and troubleshooting:

  1. Leaking water

If you’ve found several leaks with a new heater, then there might be a leaking connection at the cold water outlet or hot water inlet. In most cases, you can identify the leaks around the pressure and temperature relief valve or around those heating components. To resolve this problem, it often requires a heater repair. However, it is rare for a new unit to leak.

  1. Dripping water

When drips are identified at the discharging pipe of the pressure and temperature relief valve, perhaps the water pressure in your house is too high and the system might need a thermal expansion tank.

  1. No heated water

It often takes a couple of hours for a new electric water heater to get the usual operating temperature. So if you do not feel the water being hot or even warm after 2 hours, make sure to check if the unit is connecting with electrical power. In fact, lacking power is one of the most common reasons for this problem.

  1. Water pressure

Use a gauge to examine the pressure of water in your home. In most case, the recommended pressure ranges from 45 to 55 PSIG. If the reading exceeds this range, you need to adjust the current regulating valve immediately or set up a new one.

heater repair

As for water pressure problems, ask for help from an experienced plumber or a local water utility. Most of the plumbing standards require a PRV when the pressure of water is higher than 80 PSIG.

  1. Check for electrical power

To check for electrical power, you can use a circuit tester. However, a meter – which measures voltage – is necessary to implement a more thorough diagnosis of some electrical issues.

First, you need to turn off the circuit breaker that is marked as “water heater” or remove the fuses. After that, remove the upper access panel of the heater, the insulation, as well as the plastic cover. Find out the power supply wire. Turn on the circuit breaker and measure the voltage.

  1. Not enough hot water

In case your new heater does not produce enough amount of hot water as expected, you might need to adjust the thermostats. In most cases, it is recommended to set the temperature no more than 120 Fahrenheit degrees since a higher temperature is likely to increase the risks of scalding injuries. Another possible cause is that your unit might not get the right voltage. In other words, the water heater would be so small compared to your usage.

  1. Thermal expansion tank

Water always expands when it is heated. Thus, most modern heaters come with some backflow prevention valves to help keep the water from entering the water supply again.

A thermal expansion tank is often designed with an internal air bladder that would take in all expanded water to protect your water heater. For this reason, most houses need this unit, otherwise, they would face a dripping discharging pipe.